Friends of Hobbs
State Park-Conservation Area

Hobbs News - don't miss a thing!

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  • 16 Feb 2018 11:41 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Once again our feathered friends will be at center stage at Hobbs State Park – Conservation Area during our third annual program series: Birds N Breakfast.  Come enjoy a cup of coffee or juice and have a muffin with the birds. Have you ever seen all the feathers of a goldfinch, chickadee, or other songbird up close?  Well, this is your chance.   Don’t forget your camera. 

    Special thanks to our sponsors, Wild Birds Unlimited, 3-D Pet Products and The Bluebird Shed!

    From 9:00 a.m. until 10:30 a.m. the Wildlife Society of the University of Arkansas will be catching song birds, handling them so the public can really see them, and then releasing them back into the wild.  Learn about how this type of research has taught us many things we now know about birds.

    Where:  Hobbs State Park – Conservation Area Visitor Center
                 (Hwy 12 just east of the Hwy 12/War Eagle Road intersection)

    2018 Dates:  February 24, March 3 and April 14 

    Time:    9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

    Cost:      Breakfast and activities FREE - Registration not required…a great family activity.

    For more information, call:  479-789-5000


  • 12 Feb 2018 10:25 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Mother Nature apparently “got up on the wrong side of her bed” and sprinkled ice on many of our NW Arkansas roads.  Sweetheart cruises on February 10th and 11th had to be cancelled, but have been rescheduled for the following weekend.  As a result of the dinner cruise cancellations, many spots have opened up, giving others an opportunity to get in on the fun.

    Do something unique with your loved one.  Share the wonders of nature on beautiful Beaver Lake looking for bald eagles plus enjoy a scrumptious and a musically fun lunch at Ventris Trails End Resort

    Lunch features bacon wrapped pork loin with mushrooms, onions, and cheese, twice baked potato, seasoned green beans, French onion soup and salad with homemade bread rolls, chocolate sheet cake, tea, or coffee.  Vegetarian option is a yummy portabella mushroom sandwich.   Alcoholic beverages are available at an additional charge.

    You have two Sweetheart Cruises to choose from.  One will run Saturday February 17th and the other Sunday February 18th.  Each cruise will leave Rocky Branch Marina promptly at 11:00 am and return at 2:00 pm.

    Cost: $40 per person:   Reservations and prepayment necessary.   Contact Hobbs State Park – Conservation Area to reserve your spot.                       

    Call (479) 789-5000. 


  • 12 Feb 2018 10:23 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Moonshine got its name from the alcohol being moved by moonlight to decrease the chances of being detected, but there was a distinction.  Moonshine, according to Ozark folklore, was made at night; white lightning was made in the day; and white mule was the stuff that was made so far back in the hills it took a mule to haul it out.

    Making whisky in the Ozarks was a craft, just like making candles, soap, or musical instruments.  Almost everyone did it.  Bill Holman’s dad was a local law enforcement officer during prohibition.  Holman said, “Moonshine was so popular in the Ozarks, that at one point a local man offered $10 to anyone to pick a house between Eureka Springs, Arkansas, and Gateway, Arkansas where it wasn't for sale. “     No takers.

    A number of years ago a former Benton County Sherriff, and one-time moonshiner, told a Hobbs Park interpreter, "At one time there were so many moonshiners in Benton County that you had to wear a name tag to tell each other apart." 

    It was a risky business, but with great rewards.  Corn was worth more by the gallon than by the bushel, and the feds were tough in the Ozarks.  According to Ozarks Watch, “In the 40 years that followed Prohibition, 6,000 stills were seized by federal agents in Arkansas and Missouri.”

    Susan Young, outreach coordinator at the Shiloh Museum of Ozark History in Springdale, (and wonderful story teller) will present Stills in the Hills: A History of Moonshining in the Ozarks at Hobbs State Park.  Young will speak about the history, the craft of making moonshine, and share stories from some oral history interviews she did in Madison County with folks who shared their memories of moonshine and moonshiners.  Don’t miss her revealing and fun program.

    Where:  Hobbs State Park visitor center located on Hwy 12 just east of the Hwy. 12/War Eagle Road intersection
    When:     February 18, 2018    2:00 pm
    Cost:        Free – Public invited      
    For more information, call:  479-789-5000


  • 12 Feb 2018 10:17 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Entomology is the study of insects and related organisms.  According to the current president of the organization, Hillary Fischer, “We as a society were founded in 1991 for the purpose of getting everyone in Arkansas together to share our research.  If you are interested in becoming a member of the AES and want to participate in our meeting at Hobbs State Park, please contact me at:  hillfisch@gmail.com.”

    If you just want to bring the kids to have some free fun with insects, leave the afternoon of February 17 open.   The afternoon portion of the AES gathering boasts an “Open House” where there will be booths set up to learn about insects.  There will be a live bug zoo, and collection boxes.  There will also be microscopes with things to look at and people there to talk about them.  In addition, there will be crafts for the kids and other activities.

    What kid doesn’t like insects?  What parent doesn’t like free kid activities?  It’s a kid, insect, parent match made in heaven.  Don’t miss it!

    Where:  Hobbs State Park visitor center located on Hwy 12 just east of the Hwy. 12/War Eagle Road intersection
    When:  February 17, 2018 - Open House 1 pm – 3 pm
    Cost:        Free – Public invited      

    For more information, call:  479-789-5000


  • 29 Jan 2018 1:43 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    We have a number of workshops, speakers, activities and programs scheduled for 2018. Please find a list below.  For questions on any of our programs or activities please call:  479-789-5000

    Unless otherwise noted, all Friends of Hobbs speakers begin at 2:00 pm. In the visitor center.

    SPEAKER SERIES/WORKSHOPS

    January

    January 7 Sunday Mike Martin – Bald Eagles with new photos
    January 21 Sunday Jim Warnock – Thru-Hike - Ozark Highlands Trail hike over Christmas break + shorter sections that are good day hikes.

    February

    February 4 – Sunday Steve Dunlap – The Osage Indians in Arkansas
    February 18 – Sunday Susan Young - Moonshiners

    March

    March 10 – Saturday – Jamie Brandon  -  “Recent Research into Old Archeological Collections from Ozark Bluff Shelters”
    March 18 – Sunday – Rick Jones – Cavity Nesters

    April

    April 1 - Sunday – Flip Putthoff – How to fish Beaver Lake
    April 8 - John David McFarland – Arkansas Fossils

    May

    May 5 – Tamara Walkingstick – Wild Edibles workshop
    May 6  – Jared Phillips More on back landers – Ozark Access Catalog and other publications written to help the back landers make sense of the Ozarks.

    June

    June 3 – Sunday – Denis Dean – Polar Bears vs. Climate Change    
    June 23 – Joan Reynolds – Glades

    July

    July 1 – Sunday – Brooks Blevins "The Old Ozarks: Things You Didn't Know about Life before the Civil War."    
    July 15, Sunday Lyshell Hiatt -  painting workshop         2-4 pm

    August

    August 5th, Sunday – Mike Martin – Beautiful Birds of Arkansas    
    August 25, Saturday – Dr. Elizabeth Horton – How pre historic
    peoples used plants in the Ozarks

    September

    September 9 – Sunday – Jon Stein – Beaver Nursery Pond
    September 16 – Sunday – Rose Gergerich – Social Impact of Plant Disease

    October

    October 14 – Sunday – Abby Burnett – “I See Dead People”– Portraits Found on Tombstones

    November

    November 4 - Dr. Steven J. Beaupre - Venomous Snakes of Arkansas with studies

    Programs with the Sugar Creek Astronomical Society


     Lunar Eclipse on Jan 31, 2018

    o   Hobbs State Park visitor center
    o   Jan 20, 2018
    o   5 pm Lecture
    o   6 pm Night Sky Viewing
    o   Cost:  Free

    Vernal Equinox on Mar 20th

    o   Hobbs State Park visitor center
    o   March 17, 2018
    o   7 pm Lecture
    o   8 pm Night Sky Viewing
    o   Cost:  Free

    Jupiter (At opposition and visible all night)

    o   Hobbs State Park visitor center
    o   May 12, 2018
    o   7:30 pm Lecture
    o   8:30 pm Night Sky Viewing
    o   Cost:  Free

    Messier Objects

    o   Hobbs State Park visitor center
    o   July 7, 2018
    o   8 pm Lecture
    o   9 pm Night Sky Viewing
    o   Cost:  Free

    Neptune

    o   Hobbs State Park visitor center
    o   September 8, 2018
    o   7 pm Lecture
    o   8 pm Night Sky Viewing
    o   Cost:  Free

     How to Purchase a Telescope

    o   November 10, 2018
    o   5 pm Lecture
    o   6 pm Night Sky Viewing
    o   Cost:  Free

    Programs with the Photographic Society of NW Arkansas

    Note:  These programs are designed for the “average bear”.  You do NOT have to be a professional to participate in these programs.

    How to Photograph Eagles

    • January 13, 2018:  This is a regular day for an eagle cruise.  Special lecture begins 1 hour before regular cruise time.  PSNWA is checking for lecture at Bland Chapel.
    • Open to public:  Denis Dean interpreter
    • Limit to 12:        tripods
    • Time: 2 pm – 4:30 pm
    • Front desk has a note on the people limit on this cruise

    Nature Photography for Beginners

    • March 17, 2018
    • For the public
    • Time: 4 pm – 5 pm:  visitor center

    Photographing night sky objects with SCAS

    • May 12
    • Time:  7:30 pm – 10:30 pm: visitor center

    Wildflower Shoot

    • Promote for beginners
    • June 16, 2018
    • Time:  5 pm – 7:30 pm:  visitor center

    Dragonflies

    • Bob Thomas
    • July 14, 2018
    • Lecture and photoshoot
    • Time:  6 pm – 8:30 pm:  visitor center

    Photography by moonlight

    • August 25, 2018
    • Time:  6:30 pm – 8:30 pm:  visitor center

    Beginning Nature Photography – Repeat if went well in March

    • September 22 - Saturday
    • Time:  4 pm – 7:30 pm:  visitor center

    Photo Walk Fall Colors

    • November 3, 2018 - 7:30 am – Steve talk PVW
    • Van Winkle Hollow trailhead

     HOBBS PROGRAMMING

    • Mother Nature Reads
      Every 2nd Saturday of each month:  10:30 am:  visitor center
    • Fall Festival:  Sunday October 7, 2018
      1 pm – 4 pm Van winkle Hollow and the visitor center
    • Living Forest: Saturday October 27, 2018
      1 pm – 5 pm visitor center
    • Eagle watch cruises on Beaver Reservoir from November through February
    • Sunset, Dinner, and Valentine’s cruises on Beaver Reservoir

    For questions on any of our programs or activities please call:                   479-789-5000


     


  • 29 Jan 2018 1:42 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Do something unforgettable with your loved one this Valentine’s Day weekend.  Share the wonders of nature on beautiful Beaver Lake looking for bald eagles plus enjoy a scrumptious and a musically fun lunch at Ventris Trails End Resort. 

    Lunch features bacon wrapped pork loin with mushrooms, onions, and cheese, twice baked potato, seasoned green beans, French onion soup and salad with homemade bread rolls, chocolate sheet cake, tea, or coffee.  Vegetarian option is a yummy portabella mushroom sandwich.   Alcoholic beverages are available at an additional charge.

    You have two Sweetheart Cruises to choose from.  One will run Saturday February 10th and the other Sunday February 11th.  Each cruise will leave Rocky Branch Marina promptly at 11:00 am and return at 2:00 pm.

    Cost: $40+ tax per person:   Reservations and prepayment necessary.   Contact Hobbs State Park – Conservation Area to reserve your spot.         Call (479) 789-5000.



  • 29 Jan 2018 12:46 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Not many Native American Indian tribes were given as wide a birth as the Osage.  They weren’t exactly “cupcakes”.  They were big.  They were scary.  They were feared.  In the early 19th century, this tribe dominated much of Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Arkansas.  Their name, Osage, is a French version which roughly translates to “war-like”.

    President Jefferson noted that Osage men averaged 6 ½ feet to 7 feet tall.    That was really big by 1830 standards, since the white Europeans in the United States in 1830 averaged about 5 ½ feet tall.  A very ominous-looking statue of a typical Osage Indian stands in the state capitol building in Little Rock.

    Often the Osage would start off a hunting trip on foot, but come back with horses stolen from neighboring tribes.  Such behavior repeatedly resulted in war between the tribes.  Typical weapons used by the Osage included, muskets, knives, lances, hatchets, and strong bows with arrows made of Osage Orange wood.  The military post at Fort Smith was established to end the warring between the Osage and other tribes, mainly the Cherokee.  The Osage regarded the Cherokee as invaders.

    The War Eagle myth:   The town of War Eagle was not named after a Cherokee.  According to the Arkansas Encyclopedia of History and Culture, the signature of Hurachais, the War Eagle, appears on the 1825 Osage treaty with the U.S. that ceded area lands from the Osage to the U.S. government.  He is commonly thought to have been the Osage leader in the Huntsville area.  A town, local creek, and township are named after him.

    You will not want to miss Steve Dunlap’s presentation regarding the exciting and provocative story of the history of the Osage Indians in our area.

    Where:  Hobbs State Park visitor center located on Hwy 12 just east of the Hwy. 12/War Eagle Road intersection.

    When:    Sunday February 4, 2018

    Time:      2:00 pm lecture  

    Cost:       Free:  The public is invited.

    For more information, call:  479-789-5000

    This program is a continuation of the Friends of Hobbs Speaker’s Series. 


  • 15 Jan 2018 3:51 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    If the onset of “cabin fever” is beginning to set in, the Wonders of Winter Wildlife at Hobbs State Park will set you free.  Bring the whole family.

    Birds N breakfast:  Enjoy some coffee, juice, and donuts on us.  The University of Arkansas will be catching birds, and then releasing them back into the wild.  Bring your camera for bird photos close up.

    Local wildlife rehabilitator, Lynn Sciumbato, will give her always popular “Raptor Rescue” program using live birds native to northwest Arkansas.

    Bird expert and author, Joe Neal, will talk about the “Birds of Beaver”, while Master Naturalist, Ken Leonard, will exhibit an eagle nest model.

    Bird enthusiast, Rick Jones, will talk about the form and function of birds.

    Memorable, family-orientated “table top” programs, a short trail hike, an eagle watch cruise, and evening astronomy programs complete the activities. *

    Most activities will be at the Hobbs State Park visitor center located on Hwy. 12 just east of the Hwy. 12/War Eagle Rd. intersection

    9:00 am – 10:30 am        Birds N Breakfast

    9:00 am – 2:00 pm          Rick Jones:  Form and Function

    10:00 am – 2:00 pm        Ken Leonard:  Eagle Nest Model

    11:00 am – 12:00 pm      Lynn Sciumbato:  Raptor Rescue

    1:00 pm                           Interpreter Rebekah - Nature Hike (Ozark Plateau trail)

    1:30 pm                            Joe Neal: “Birds of Beaver”

    2:30 pm                           Interpreter Rebekah – Nature Detective

    3:00 pm                           Eagle Watch cruise*

    5:00 pm                           Astronomy - Lecture

    6:00 pm                           Astronomy – Night Viewing

    *Eagle cruises require pre-registration

    Cost:  $10+ tax/adult,   $5+ tax/child 6-12

    For more information and to register for the eagle watch tour, call: 479-789-5000


  • 15 Jan 2018 3:49 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    On January 31st a lunar eclipse will occur with ecliptic conjunction at 13:26:42.5 UT.  It will have an umbral magnitude of 1.3155 and a right ascension of 08h56m05.5s.  What?

    If you are like most folks, that is incomprehensible dribble.  Come to Hobbs State Park visitor center at 5:00 pm on Jan. 20th where Dr. Katherine Auld, astronomy professor at NWACC and NASA Solar System Ambassador, will explain how to interpret the NASA eclipse notifications.  You will learn to figure out when an eclipse will occur, where in the sky it can be seen, and how dim the moon will appear.

    Following the lecture, at 6:00 pm, enjoy a star party hosted by the Sugar Creek Astronomical Society where telescopes will be set up in the parking lot for use by the public.  Because no planets will be visible this night, it will be a time for viewing dark sky objects.  Astronomers often call these objects “faint fuzzies” because they are faint objects only visible using telescopes or binoculars.  A few objects that will be well placed for viewing on January 20th will include M33, the Triangulum Galaxy; globular cluster M15; and M45, the Pleiades open cluster, also known as the Seven Sisters.

    What to Bring if you can:

    • Flashlight (covered with a red cloth or red balloon)

    • Binoculars and/or telescope (if you have)

    • Folding chair – one per person

    • Star chart (if you have one)

    Where:   Hobbs State Park visitor center located on Hwy 12 just east of

                  the Hwy. 12/War Eagle Road intersection.

    When:    Saturday January 20, 2018

    Time:      5:00 pm lecture   6:00 pm for night viewing

    Cost:       Free

    For more information, call:  479-789-5000


  • 15 Jan 2018 3:23 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)


    Our feathered friends will be at center stage at Hobbs State Park – Conservation Area during our third annual program series: Birds and Breakfast.  Come enjoy a cup of coffee or juice and have breakfast with the birds. Have you ever seen all the feathers of a goldfinch, chickadee, or other songbird up close?  Well, this is your chance.  You will witness this unique scientific process up-close, and then help us release the birds back into the wild.  

    From 9:00 a.m. until 10:30 a.m., the Wildlife Society of the University of Arkansas will be catching song birds, handling these birds, and then releasing them back into the wild.  Learn about how this type of research has taught us many things we now know about birds.

    Where:  Hobbs State Park – Conservation Area Visitor Center
                  (Hwy 12 just east of the Hwy 12/War Eagle Road intersection)

    2018 Dates:  January 20, February 24, March 3 and April 14

    Time:    9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

    Cost:      All activities FREE! Registration not required. 

    Sponsored by:

    3-D Pet Products



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