Friends of Hobbs
State Park-Conservation Area

Hobbs News - don't miss a thing!

  • 27 Jun 2019 4:32 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)
    Named after the king of the Roman gods, Jupiter is aptly labeled as it is the largest planet in our solar system.  The 5th planet from the sun, Jupiter is a giant.  Its mass is 2 ½ times that of all the other planets in our solar system combined.



    Jupiter was known to the ancients, but it was Galileo who is known for studying it through a telescope and discovering its four largest moons.  We have sent multiple unmanned spacecraft to Jupiter, have taken amazing photographs, and learned much about this King of the Planets. 

    Join us on Saturday July 6th at 8:00pm for a lecture on Jupiter and its moons.  After the lecture, if we have clear skies, we will head outside for a Star Party where you will be able to see Jupiter and other wonders of the night sky through the powerful telescopes of members of Sugar Creek Astronomical Society.

    The event is free and open to the public.

    What to Bring if you can:

    - Folding chair – one per person

    - Star chart (if you have one)

    - Flashlight (covered with a red cloth or red balloon)

    Where:  Hobbs State Park visitor center located on Hwy. 12 just east of the Hwy. 12/War Eagle Road intersection

    When:    Saturday July 6, 2019

    Time:      8:00 pm - Lecture 
                   9:00 pm - Star Party – night sky viewing

    Cost:       Free.  The public is invited.

    For more information on the Sugar Creek Astronomical Society: https://www.facebook.com/pg/SugarCreekAstro/

    For more information on Hobbs State Park programs, trails, picnicking, or meeting room rentals:   Call:  479-789-5000 


  • 26 Jun 2019 2:12 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Since 2010, Hobbs State Park has been working closely with the Ozark Chinquapin Foundation in the effort to save a “keystone” tree, the Ozark chinquapin. 

    For years we at Hobbs State Park sent what seed we could find to the OCF.  Hobbs State Park was then the first to be successful in cross pollinating an Ozark chinquapin tree at Hobbs State Park with pollen from trees from Mississippi, Missouri, Texas, and Arkansas.  The next step was to establish an Ozark chinquapin test plot at Hobbs state Park.  The first plantings were done at Hobbs in April of 2014.

    One of the keys to saving this tree is to find single-trunked, seed producing Ozark chinquapins.  We ask the public to help us in this effort.  If you think you know of a healthy, single-trunked Ozark chinquapin tree, we ask that you share that information.

    Another key to saving the Ozark chinquapin is through important leaf research that the Ozark Chinquapin Foundation recently began at the laboratories of the Missouri Botanical Garden.  Yesterday, June 25th, I contacted Leslie Bost who is conducting the research.  When I asked how the research was progressing, she replied, “I am indeed finding very some significant findings. We have some special resistant trees on our plots. Our most resistant tree is one we originally thought was low resistance.”

    This exciting research identifies in a few days which trees are the most blight resistant.  Culling trees from our test plots that show the least resistance to the blight, and leaving the ones with the highest resistance, saves years in producing blight resistant seed that can be successfully reintroduced into the native range of the Ozark chinquapin.

    To be successful, we need more individuals knowledgeable of the Ozark chinquapin, what it meant to our wildlife before the chestnut blight hit our area in 1957, and what the Ozark Chinquapin Foundation and state parks in Arkansas and Missouri are doing to help save this tree.  Let’s talk more about this tree.

    • If you know of a healthy, single-trunked Ozark chinquapin tree, please share that information with:
    • Steve Chyrchel, Interpreter at Hobbs, and a board member – Ozark Chinquapin Foundation
    • Hobbs State Park
    • 20201 E. Hwy. 12
    • Rogers, Arkansas 72756
    • 479-789-5006
    • steve.chyrchel@arkansas.gov
    • Please take some time to learn more about the Ozark chinquapin tree.  The Ozark Chinquapin Foundation has an in-depth web site.  Check out all the links at the top of the page.


  • 24 Jun 2019 1:29 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Whether you've painted in the past, or if you have never held a paint brush, this is the nature painting workshop for you.  Lyshell Mcbride, your instructor, comes from a family of artists.  She does personal art instruction as well as group workshops for all ages.

    Lyshell will inspire you, and guide you step by step as you create your own nature masterpiece.   Thanks to her supportive teaching techniques, even the novice painter becomes successful.

    At the end of the 2-hour workshop, you will leave with new friends, new skills, and your very own painting.   Included in the price of the event is everything you will need: canvas, brushes, paint, and easel. 

    Check or cash accepted on day of workshop:   Participants must however pre-register.   Minimum age 8 years old.

    For more information and to register, call:  479-789-5000

    Where:  Hobbs State Park visitor center located on Hwy. 12 just east of the Hwy. 12/War Eagle Road intersection.

    When:  Sunday July 14     2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

    Cost:  $30 per person 

    For more information on Hobbs programs, trails, picnicking, or meeting room rental:   Call:  479-789-5000 


  • 24 Jun 2019 12:15 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Call for Volunteers: Weed Pulling Wednesday at Hobbs State Park Visitor Center with the Volunteer Coordinator!
    Time: 8:30—11:30 a.m.
    All areas around the visitor center and along the entrance-way are over-populated with an invasive species, Sericea lespedeza, which is about to start producing flowers and seeds….yikes! Gotta pull them now!!

    Additionally, our Red Bud trees have been quiet successful. There are entirely too many of these little trees growing to close to the visitor center. Many have been pulled or cut from the tops, so have pretty deep roots. If you’re up for a challenge, bring some good tools, sunscreen, insect repellent and lots of water. I can also see about bringing tools over from our maintenance complex, if given advance notice of what you need.

    Please RSVP for any of the following dates:
    June 26th
    July 3rd
    July 10th
    July 17th
    July 24th

    carla.berg@arkansas.gov or call 479-789-5009


  • 24 Jun 2019 12:11 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area will have the annual Fall Festival event on Sunday, October 6th, 2019.
    Time: 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
    Locations will be on the Historic Van Winkle Trail and at the Visitor Center.

    Fall Festival is a time when volunteers demonstrate an old timey craft. In the past (most will be here again this year) we’ve had the following crafts or demonstrations:

    Van Winkle Trail
    Blacksmith Demonstration
    Early Food Preservation
    Old Timey Games
    Music
    Stone Tool Making/Demo
    Dutch Oven Demonstration
    Pearling (the hard way to make buttons) Dowsing Demonstration
    Mountain Woman Story Teller
    Snake Oil Salesman
    Pioneer Homesteader (how to make butter) Tall Tales Tellers
    Old Cider Press

    Visitor Center:
    Weavers
    Smockers
    Lace Makers Spinners
    Apothecary Shoppe

    We are always looking for new and fun crafters, story tellers, etc. to dress up and slide back in history for a few hours to help people reflect, visualize, and experience how things use to be. If you have a skill from the past and would enjoy sharing it with others, we’d love to hear from you!

    Additionally, we could use a few behind the scenes workers to help unload the crafters earlier in the day, then help load them up at 4pm.

    Have questions? Contact Park Interpreter Steve Chyrchel at 479-789-5006 or Volunteer Coordinator Carla Berg, 479-789-5009.

  • 21 Jun 2019 10:06 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Of the 1.3 million known species of insects that inhabit the earth, four of the most bothersome are local residents of northwest Arkansas; ticks, chiggers, mosquitoes, and bed bugs.  Dr. Dayton Steelman, emeritus professor of Veterinary Entomology from the University of Arkansas-Fayetteville, will present his fascinating four-part program entitled, “Insects that Suck” on Sunday June 30th at the Hobbs State Park – Conservation Area visitor center.

    The basic biology of ticks, chiggers, mosquitoes, and bed bugs will be presented along with the disease causing pathogens and parasites that they transmit to domestic and wild animals as well as to humans.  According to Steelman, “There will be updates on mosquitos and tick species now present in the Continental United States plus there are also new pathogens that cause disease in man and animals relative to the ‘invasion’ of large numbers of humans AND their belongings entering the United States.  This will include Bed Bugs as they have become a Major problem in Urban as well as Rural areas of the country.”

    Steelman’ s programs are a must to experience by anyone who has ever encountered any of these four blood-thirsty critters.  The public is invited to enjoy one, two, or all four of these truly fascinating and informative programs.

    When:  Sunday June 30th
                  “Ticks” 1:00 p.m.
                  “Chiggers” + “Mosquitoes” 2:00 p.m.
                  “Bed bugs” 3:00 p.m.          

    Where:  Hobbs State Park – Conservation Area visitor center located on Hwy 12 just east of the Hwy 12 War Eagle Road intersection

    Cost:  FREE

    This presentation is a continuation of the Friends of Hobbs Speaker’s Series. For more information on Hobbs State Park programs, trails, picnicking, or meeting room rentals:   Call:  479-789-5000 


  • 02 Jun 2019 2:34 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Do you know the important role that native plants play in the local ecosystem and what the benefits are in using native species for landscaping and in home gardens?

    Perhaps you are stumped when it comes to planning your native plant garden and what you should look for when selecting which species to place in a particular location.  Eric Fuselier will be at Hobbs State Park to answer your questions.

    For more than a decade, Fuselier has been studying the native plants found growing wild in the Ozarks.  His love of the outdoors began on the trail as an avid hiker and backpacker, but eventually he was able to put his knowledge of native plants to use in a more professional capacity while working as an environmental scientist for a local engineering firm.

    Don’t miss this opportunity to learn from a professional how to utilize native plants at your home.

    Where:  Hobbs State Park visitor center on Hwy. 12 just east of the Hwy. 12/War Eagle Road intersection

    When:  Sunday July 21, 2019

    Time:  2:00 pm

    Cost:  Free. The public is invited.

    For more information on Hobbs State Park programs, trails, picnicking, or meeting room rentals:   Call:  479-789-5000


  • 21 May 2019 4:33 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Whether you've painted in the past, or if you have never held a paint brush, this is the nature painting workshop for you.  Lyshell Reann Hiatt-Blech, your instructor, comes from a family of artists.  She does personal art instruction as well as group workshops for all ages.

    Lyshell will inspire you, and guide you step by step as you create your own nature masterpiece.   Thanks to her supportive teaching techniques, even the novice painter becomes successful.

    At the end of the 2-hour workshop, you will leave with new friends, new skills, and your very own painting.   Included in the price of the event is everything you will need: canvas, brushes, paint, and easel. 

    Check or cash accepted on day of workshop:   Participants must pre-register.   Minimum age 8 years old…

    For more information and to register, call:  479-789-5000

    Where:  Hobbs State Park visitor center located on Hwy. 12 just east of the Hwy.  12/War Eagle Road intersection.

    When:  Sunday July 14, 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

    Cost:  $30 per person 

    For more information on Hobbs programs, trails, picnicking, or meeting room rental:   Call:  479-789-5000 


  • 02 May 2019 4:31 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Now in its seventh year, National Kids to Parks Day is sponsored by the National Parks Trust.  Kids to Parks Day urges kids across the country to discover science, history, nature and adventure.  This annual event helps kids and families develop more active, healthy lifestyles, and create lifelong memories as well as offering educational opportunities.  Kids to Parks Day events happen throughout the spring, and take place all across the country.

    The following activities are offered at Hobbs State Park on National Kids to Parks Day, May 18th:

    ·       8:00 am – 11:00 am Bird Walk with Rick Jones   
    Rick is an avid birder with over 50 years of field experience.  He is a certified Cornell Labs of Ornithology nest box monitor with bluebird nest box trails at the Botanical Gardens of the Ozarks (BGO).   Rick will cover both the Historic Van Winkle Trail and the Sinking Stream Trail. (Same parking lot) Explore the area with Rick for birds for 1 hour, 2 hours, or stay the entire 3 hours…easy return to the parking lot.  Children 8 and up for this one please.  Meet at the Van Winkle/Sinking Stream Trail head on Highway 12, 1 ½ miles west of the visitor center.

    ·      11:00 am – 11:45 Mothers of Nature                                          
    Join Park interpreter Kiara while you learn about the many mothers in Nature.   This is a fun time for the little ones.  Meet at the front desk of the visitor center.

    ·      1:00 pm – 1:45 pm Nature Scavenger Hunt                
    Interpreter Kiara takes families out on the Sinking Stream Trail to search for some of Nature’s fun and curious things.  Meet at the Van Winkle/Sinking Stream parking lot on Highway 12, 1 ½ miles west of the visitor center. 

    ·      3:00 pm – 3:45 pm Mothers of Nature                                       
    Join Park interpreter Kiara while you learn about the many mothers in Nature.   This is a fun time for the little ones.  Meet at the front desk of the visitor center.

    When:    Saturday May 18, 2019

    Cost:       Free.  The public is invited.

    For more information on Hobbs State Park programs, trails, picnicking, or meeting room rentals:   Call:  479-789-5000 


  • 16 Apr 2019 10:25 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Many of our grandparents and parents used wild plants for food and medicine.  We all know about sassafras tea and the glorious taste of wild blackberries, but we have perhaps forgotten how extensively wild plants can be used as food sources.  In the early 1970's, information on native wild foods and medicinal uses of wild plants became very popular.  The well-known naturalist, Euell Gibbons, told us, “My love affair with nature is so deep that I am not satisfied with being a mere onlooker, or nature tourist.  I crave a more real and meaningful relationship.  The spicy teas and tasty delicacies I prepare from wild ingredients are the bread and wine in which I have communion and fellowship with nature, and with the Author of that nature.”

    Dr. Walkingstick, who will conduct the Wild Edibles Workshop at Hobbs State Park, has recently retired from the University of Arkansas, Division of Agriculture, Co-operative Extension Service as an Associate Professor of Extension Forestry.  Tamara serves on several boards including the Arkansas American Indian Center, Arkansas Women in Agriculture, the National Network of Forest Practitioners, and is a member of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma.

    Walkingstick noted, “In this comprehensive 4-hour workshop, you will not only learn to identify some edible species of Arkansas native and non-native vegetation, you will also have the opportunity to sample some excitingly tasty dishes.  The presentation covers concepts of conservation, history, culture, and plant identification.  30 pages of wild edible recipes are included as well.”

    When:  Sunday May 5, 2019
    Time:  10 am to 2 pm
    Where: The workshop will be held at the Hobbs State Park visitor center located on Hwy 12 just east of the Hwy 12/War Eagle Road intersection.
    Cost:  $25 per person -  Check or cash accepted on day of workshop:   Participants must pre-register.   For more information and to register, call:  479-789-5000


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