Friends of Hobbs
State Park-Conservation Area

Hobbs News - don't miss a thing!

  • 09 Apr 2019 11:45 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Earth Day is an annual event where family-centered activities are held worldwide to demonstrate support for environmental protection.  It was first celebrated in 1970, and is now coordinated globally by the Earth Day Network and celebrated in more than 192 countries each year.

    This year, Hobbs State Park – Conservation Area celebrates Earth Day on Saturday April 13th throughout the Park.

    9:00 am – 10:30 am   Birds N. Breakfast
    Our feathered friends will be at center stage at Hobbs State Park.  Come enjoy a cup of coffee or juice and have breakfast with the birds.  Have you ever seen all the feathers of a goldfinch, chickadee, or other songbird up close?  Well, this is your chance.  You will witness this unique scientific process up-close, and then help us release the birds back into the wild.  Bring your children and your camera.

    10:30 am    Fun with Mother Nature
    Mother Nature herself has become a frequent visitor to Hobbs State Park –Conservation Area.  She visits the park every second Saturday of the month and reads nature stories to her little followers.  Story time will be followed by “hands-on” nature-craft activities.  Children of all ages are welcome, however most stories target children   3-6 years of age.

    11:00 am   Morning Star Wildlife Rehabilitation Center brings live raptors
    Local wildlife rehabilitator, Lynn Sciumbato, will give her always popular “Raptor Rescue” program using live birds native to northwest Arkansas.  Great Family fun!

    1:00 pm – 2:00 pm   Hike Sinking Stream Trail with interpreter Chris
    Another great family activity!  Sinking Stream Trail originates in the Historic Van Winkle Trail parking lot just west of the intersection of Hwy 12 and War Eagle Road.  It’s only a ½ mile hike.

    1:00 pm – 4:00 pm   Table Top crafts in the lobby of the Park’s visitor center.
    Round out the day’s activities with crafts that all ages will have fun doing.

    All Hobbs Earth Day activities are Free.  For more information, questions, or directions call:  479-789-5000

    For more information on Hobbs programs, trails, picnicking, or meeting room rental:   Call:  479-789-5000 


  • 03 Apr 2019 3:02 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Those who wish to learn the basics of fly casting will want to attend the Fly Casting 101 workshop to be held at the Hobbs State Park – Conservation Area visitor center Sunday April 14, 2019 from 12:00 p.m. to 4 p.m.  Two hours of instruction will be in the classroom, and two hours will be outside. 

    Participants will learn four basic casts, the six basic types of flies (lures), how to cast and “play” the flies in the water, how to read water, how to wade, how to purchase and assemble your equipment, how to store your equipment, as well as how to tie the four basic knots used by fly fishers.  All equipment will be provided. 

    The workshop will be taught by Sallyann Brown, past recipient of the “Woman of the Year” and the “Federation of Fly Fishers Educator of the Year” awards from the Federation of Fly Fishers, Inc.

    When:  Sunday April 14, 2019

    Time:  12:00 noon to 4:00 p.m.

    Where: The workshop will be held at the Hobbs State Park visitor center located on Hwy 12 just east of the Hwy 12/War Eagle Road intersection.

    Minimum age is 12 yrs.  Cost:  $35 per person + tax.   Reservations and pre-payment required.   

    For questions, and to register call: 479-789-5000

    For more information on Hobbs State Park programs, trails, picnicking, or meeting room rentals:   Call:  479-789-5000 


  • 03 Apr 2019 2:54 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    The weather is getting nice!  Let’s get out and enjoy some part of the 35 miles of trails at Hobbs State Park.  What’s special next Saturday is that it’s Al Knox Trail Day at the Park.

    For many years Al Knox volunteered to take care of the Hobbs’ trails, then for some 17 years officially served as the Trail Maintenance Supervisor.  To honor Al’s service, we now have Al Knox Trail Day.

    Join Mr. Al himself at 10:00 am at the Van Winkle Trailhead on Hwy. 12 just west of the visitor Center.  He will guide you on a pleasant ½ mile hike on the Sinking Stream Nature Trail on the south side of Highway 12.

    Things turn historical at 11:00 am on the ½ mile barrier-free Van Winkle Trail on the north side of Highway 12.  From the same parking lot, join Diane and Jim Gately.  They have been volunteering at Hobbs State Park for a plethora of duties for as long as anyone remembers.  The Gatelys are experts on the Peter Van Winkle History, and are always looking forward to taking groups of Park visitors back to 1858 when Peter Van Winkle built the first steam-driven saw mill in the Ozarks.

    Take advantage of this opportunity for free, guided hikes with the experts themselves.

    Where: Van Winkle Parking lot on Hwy. 12 just west of the Hwy. 12/War Eagle Road                                 intersection
    When: Saturday April 6, 2019
    Time: 10:00 am:  Sinking Stream Trail hike with Al Knox
              11:00 am:  Van Winkle Historical Trail hike with Diane and Jim Gately
    Cost: Free.  The public is invited.

    For more information on Hobbs State Park programs, trails, picnicking, or meeting room rentals:   Call:  479-789-5000 



  • 03 Apr 2019 2:39 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Although small earthquakes do occur in northwest Arkansas there is little known risk to the general population.  The faults that these earthquakes emanate from are not generally identified as they cause no surface offsets. The greatest risk of serious damage due to earthquakes is northeast Arkansas and one day we will need to assist them in the damage recovery efforts.

    According to John David McFarland, retired Arkansas Chief Geologist, “Arkansas is at great risk of experiencing a large damaging earthquake in the not too distant future.  Recent studies suggest that this threat is as great today as at any time in the last hundred years.  Each day that goes by brings us one day closer to a catastrophe the likes of which we have not seen in modern times here in Arkansas.  In 1811-1812 a series of seismic events struck the northeast Arkansas - Missouri boot heel region, what is now generally called the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ), in such numbers and with such intensities that it took a full century for the area to fully recover. 

    Today's modern society is even less resistant to the potential for damage than the world of the early 1800s.  Although current understanding supports the view that great earthquakes (magnitude 8 and larger) are not very likely to occur for several hundred years, large damaging shocks (magnitudes between 6 and 7.9) are in fact, overdue.

    In order to understand the damage potential of a major seismic event we only have to look at the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake in California.  That earthquake has been rated at a magnitude of 7.1.  It resulted in billions of dollars in damage and killed over 60 people.  A similar sized event in Arkansas could do at least as much damage and there are several geologic considerations that strongly suggest that it would likely cause significantly more wide-spread devastation than the Loma Prieta event.  Further, the impact of such a tragedy on this state's overall economy would spread that adversity throughout the state and extend the recovery period over many years.  Severe disruptions of utilities and lifelines, banking and finance, and agriculture are specifically projected following such an event.

    As there is nothing we can do to stop or prevent earthquakes our only hope is to understand them and the forces that they produce.  With knowledge comes resilience.  With knowledge comes the security of effective preparation.  With knowledge comes proficient and efficient recovery after the fact.  Earthquake processes are so complex that no model or theory developed elsewhere for another fault zone can clearly predict the action of a New Madrid earthquake on the people and infrastructure of this state in a specific way.  It is only by monitoring local seismic activity and measuring the response of our infrastructure to these local events that we will gain insight into the impact that a massive seismic displacement will have. “

    The upcoming program at Hobbs State Park on Arkansas Earthquakes will be presented by John David McFarland, who was Chairman of the Arkansas Earthquake Advisory Council for 21 years.  (The Council was formed to assist people, business, and emergency planners of the parts of the state where earthquakes may be a realistic problem.  Among many other activities the Council helped design earthquake building codes for Arkansas.) 

    McFarland’s presentation is free and the public is invited.  

    Where: Hobbs State Park visitor center on Highway 12 just east of the Hwy 12/War Eagle Road intersection

    When: Sunday April 7, 2019 at 2:00 p.m.

    Cost: Free

    For more information on Hobbs State Park programs, trails, picnicking, or meeting room rentals:   Call:  479-789-5000 


  • 29 Mar 2019 3:04 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Take your star gazing to the next level!  Join us for a night of sky gazing and dark sky photography with Sugar Creek Astronomical Society and the Photographic Society of Northwest Arkansas.  The focus of this event is to appreciate our dark skies and to learn about the techniques and equipment needed to capture your own images of the starry night.

    Tim Johnson of the Photographic Society of NWA will start the night with a presentation on night sky photography.  Kent Marts from Sugar Creek Astronomical Society will follow with a presentation on Light Pollution and what we can do to help preserve our dark skies.  After the lectures are complete we will head outside to the parking lot where, weather permitting, we will do some observing through binoculars and telescopes, and we will also endeavor to take some night sky photographs.

    Bring your camera and tripod for an opportunity to practice in the visitor center parking lot after the lectures.  You will want a camera with the ability to adjust the aperture, shutter speed, and ISO.  You will also need to be able to manually focus your camera.  A cable release is optional but can be helpful.

    The event is free and open to the public.

    What to Bring if you can:
    - Binoculars (if you have)
    - Folding chair – one per person
    - Star chart (if you have one)
    - Flashlight (covered with a red cloth or red balloon)

    Where:  Hobbs State Park Visitor Center located on Hwy. 12 just east of the Hwy. 12/War Eagle Road intersection

    When:   Saturday April 6th, 2019
    ·       6:30 pm Lecture
    ·       8:00 pm for Star Party and Night Photography

    Cost:       Free

    Sugar Creek Astronomical Society’s Facebook Page is: https://www.facebook.com/pg/SugarCreekAstro/

    The NWA Photographic Society’s Facebook Page is:
    https://www.facebook.com/PSNWA/

    For more information on Hobbs State Park programs, trails, picnicking, or meeting room rentals:   Call:  479-789-5000 


  • 29 Mar 2019 2:58 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    A maintenance position has become available at Hobbs State Park - Conservation Area.

    Maintenance TechnicianPosition #:    22078267
    Salary:         $29,046 - $33,402
    Pay Grade:    GS04
    Location:      Hobbs State Park–Conservation Area, Rogers, AR

    Closing date: 04/12/2019

    This position is responsible for overseeing and participating in the maintenance and operation of all park facilities, grounds and equipment in a 12,000-acre park.  Applicant will perform skilled and non-skilled maintenance duties, including basic carpentry, plumbing, electrical, cleaning, mowing, weed trimming, trash removal, vehicle maintenance, and other labor related maintenance activities.  Other job duties include supervising, training, and participating in the work of regular and seasonal employees, community service workers, and volunteers involved in maintenance functions.  This position also maintains equipment history records, inventory of supplies and materials, facility and system inspections, and other assigned record keeping responsibilities.  Must have a valid driver’s license, be able to work a varied schedule, including weekends and holidays, and be able to traverse rough terrain.  A driver’s record check will be performed.  Applicants with computer skills in Microsoft Office are preferred.

    This position offers a full benefit package including paid holidays, annual and sick leave, health insurance and retirement pension.

    Applicants must meet or exceed the following qualifications:  The formal education equivalent of a high school diploma; plus two years of vocational technical training in maintenance operations; plus two years of experience in general maintenance operations.

    EOE/AA/ADA  Women and minorities are encouraged to apply.

    Applications accepted online ONLY:  www.arstatejobs.com.


  • 28 Mar 2019 10:11 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Isn’t stress in our daily lives exciting?  Look at all the benefits: Heart disease + stroke, pre-mature aging, impaired immune system, gastro intestinal disease, irritable bowel syndrome, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, tension headaches, anxiety, depression, anger, and the list of fun goes on, and on, and on.

    It’s been said that reality is the leading cause of stress for those in touch with it.  You know you’re stressed when you start getting on your own nerves.  Are there only two times that you feel stressed – day and night?  Do you feel like a fish in a blender, and here comes some demented scallywag lunging at the switch?

    Jump back a minute!  Nurse Kim wants to talk to you.   She will show you easy, pleasant, and successful ways you can deal with stress.  Yes!  It is very easily doable.

    Kim Starble has been in some form of nursing for 39 years.  Before retiring, she held the Certification as a Rehabilitation Registered Nurse (CRRN).  She has served as a nursing educator, and an infection control and wound care travel nurse.  She’s seen and done it all.  Nurse Kim understands stress!

    As part of the Friends of Hobbs Speaker Series, Kim will be presenting her program on “Stress, and the Nature of Things” at Hobbs State Park this Sunday.  Nurse Kim says, “Get out of that work cubicle.  Get away from that concrete and asphalt.  Give your mind a vacation, and sincerely do what Bugs Bunny tells us all to do – ‘Unlax’.”  Don’t miss this opportunity for Nurse Kim to show you truly enjoyable, and successful ways to – unlax.

    Where:  Hobbs State Park visitor center located on Hwy 12 just east of the Hwy. 12/War Eagle Road intersection.

    When:  Sunday March 31, 2019

    Time:  2:00 pm

    Cost:  Free. The public is invited.

    For more information on Hobbs State Park programs, trails, picnicking, or meeting room rentals:   Call:  479-789-5000

  • 14 Mar 2019 4:09 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Hobbs State Park begins celebrating Arbor Day this Saturday, followed by a week of guided hikes and family oriented events.  Activities include:

    Sat., Mar. 16th, 10:00-10:45 AM, 12:00-12:45 PM, 2:00-2:45 PM:
    • Arkansas Arbor Day Hikes: Celebrate Arkansas Arbor Day (Mar. 18th) by going on a kid-friendly tree hike with Park Interpreter Chris to learn more about the trees of Hobbs! The hike will be an easy half mile on the Ozark Plateau Trail, which is ADA accessible.
    • Sat., Mar. 16, 10:00 am – 3:00 pm Learn about the famous Ozark chinquapin tree.  Mr. Al Knox will have a collection of all things Ozark chinquapin:  photos, burs, seeds, cookie, plank, Native American atlatl, etc.  Mr. Al was part of the original planting crew of the Hobbs test plot for Ozark chinquapins.  Come talk to Al about this wonderful tree.

    Sat., Mar. 16th, 2:30-5:00 PM:

    • Basic Nature Photography Class: Join the Photographic Society of NW Arkansas for this free class presented by Jay Stout and Cleeo Wright. Bring your camera to learn tips and trick on how to better use its features.

    Sun., March 17th, 11:00 – 11:45 AM:

    • Strolling on the Plateau: Do you know the destination of a trail? And just what is the Ozark Plateau? Join Interpreter Steve to learn more about your State Park.

    Sun., March 17th, 1:00 – 2:00 PM:

    • Historic Van Winkle Hike: Join Interpreter Steve on an easy stroll through the Historic Van Winkle Hollow and learn about the Van Winkle mill, the largest in the state of Arkansas all through the 1870’s. The area is on the National Register of Historic Places. Meet at the Van Winkle trailhead.

    Sun., March 17th, 3:30 – 4:00 PM:

    • Arkansas Symbols – Do You Know Them? Some of the symbols are easy, and others you probably have never heard of. Did you know we have a state soil and a State beverage? Join interpreter Steve to learn some of the symbols of Arkansas.

    Mon., March 18th, 11:00 – 11:45 AM:

    • Strolling on the Plateau: Do you know the destination of a trail? And just what is the Ozark Plateau? Join Interpreter Steve to learn more about your State Park.

    Mon., March 18th, 1:00 – 1:30 PM:

    • Ask Me Turtle questions: Join Park Interpreter Steve while you learn some interesting facts about our reptile friends. Why are there 5 toes on a 3-toed box turtle? There is an easy way to tell the difference between a boy and a girl turtle. Do you know the secret?

    Mon., March 18th, 3:00 – 3:30 PM:

    • Venomous Snakes of Arkansas: Everyone who lives in Arkansas should be aware of what venomous snakes we have and what they look like. This short program identifies the 6 venomous snakes that we have in Arkansas, four of which are found in northwest Arkansas.

    Tues., March 19th, 10:00 – 10:50 AM:

    • All Snakes Are Not Bad! Join Hobbs volunteer, Steve Kick, and learn how to identify and avoid snakes, how they contribute to our ecosystem, and hopefully develop an understanding and respect for them so we can co-exist.

    Tues., March 19th, 1:00 – 1:30 PM:

    • Puffballs in the Sky: Is a cloud just a cloud? No sir! Clouds can tell us things. Clouds can do things. Do you know what thunder really is? Why do tornadoes form in clouds? Join Park Interpreter Steve to learn about our amazing clouds…puffballs in the sky.

    Wed., March 20th, 10:00 – 10:45 AM:

    • Strolling on the Plateau: Do you know the destination of a trail? And just what is the Ozark Plateau? Join Interpreter Steve to learn more about your State Park.

    Wed., March 20th, 1:00 – 1:30 PM:

    • Be a Nature Detective: Have you ever been on the trails and not seen an animal?  Join a park interpreter as we learn how to look for clues about our native animals and figure out who left them. This mystery will be uncovered on our .25 mile paved trail and off the trail located at the visitor center.

    Wed., March 20th, 3:30 – 4:30 PM:

    • Spring Bird Hike: Come and enjoy an afternoon hike in the Ozarks and listen for the sounds of spring migrants and other song birds. We’ll spend an hour exploring the Sinking Stream Trail looking for spring surprises of the feathered variety. Bring your own binoculars or borrow a pair of ours. Meet at the Sinking Stream trailhead.

    Thurs., Mar. 21st, 11:00 - 11:30 AM:

    • Reptile Rap: Join a park interpreter for this fun and lively program, perfect for families with young children, as we learn about the reptiles of Hobbs State Park. Be ready for an up-close encounter with a live turtle and a snake, and we’ll wrap up with the reptile rap!

    Thurs., Mar. 21st, 2:00 - 2:45 PM:

    • Signs of Spring Hike on the Sinking Stream Trail: Are you ready for spring?! Join a park interpreter on this easy half mile hike as we discover the signs of spring in the beautiful Van Winkle Hollow area. Meet at the Sinking Stream trailhead.

    Fri., Mar. 22nd, 10:00 – 10:45 AM:

    • Signs of Spring Hike on the Sinking Stream Trail: Are you ready for spring?! Join a park interpreter on this easy half mile hike as we discover the signs of spring in the beautiful Van Winkle Hollow area. Meet at the Sinking Stream trailhead.

    Fri., Mar. 22nd, 2:00 – 2:45 PM:

    • What Lives in Little Clifty Creek? Celebrate World Water Day with Park Interpreter Chris by exploring Little Clifty Creek along the Historic Van Winkle trail. With dip nets and kick seines we’ll catch insects, snails, crawdads and other aquatic macroinvertebrates, and who knows what else?! Learn how the critters can tell us if the water is clean or polluted. Meet at the Historic Van Winkle trailhead, and bring rubber boots or waders if you have them.

    Sat., Mar. 23rd, 11:00 – 11:30 AM:

    • Reptile Rap: Join a park interpreter for this fun and lively program, perfect for families with young children, as we learn about the reptiles of Hobbs State Park. Be ready for an up-close encounter with a live turtle and a snake, and we’ll wrap up with the reptile rap!
    Sat., Mar. 23rd, 1:00 – 1:45 PM:
    • Signs of Spring Hike on the Sinking Stream Trail: Are you ready for spring?! Join a park interpreter on this easy half mile hike as we discover the signs of spring in the beautiful Van Winkle Hollow area. Meet at the Sinking Stream trailhead.
    Sat., Mar. 23rd, 2:30 – 3:15 PM:
    • Kermit and Friends: Amphibians of Hobbs State Park: It’s not easy being green and slimy! Learn more about our amphibian friends, the frogs, toads and salamanders, with Park Interpreter Chris. After an indoor introduction, we’ll check out the ponds near the Visitor Center and see what’s hoppin’! Learn how you can help monitor frog populations, which have been declining, by participating in Frog Watch, a nationwide community science project.

    Sun., March 24th, 11:00 – 11:45 AM:

    • Strolling on the Plateau: Do you know the destination of a trail? And just what is the Ozark Plateau? Join Interpreter Steve to learn more about your State Park.

    Sun., March 24th, 12:30 – 1:15 PM:

    • The Ozark Chinquapin Tree: Learn from Park Interpreter Steve why this rare tree, once common in the Ozarks, is so important and what we are doing at Hobbs State Park to try and save it.

    Sun., March 24th, 2:00 – 3:00 PM:

    • Friends of Hobbs Speaker Series: Victoria Jones, “Recent Archaeology at Pea Ridge National Military Park”

    For more information, call:  479-789-5000

  • 13 Mar 2019 10:52 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Want a great way to utilize part of your upcoming Saturday?  Spend a photographic afternoon at Hobbs State Park with the Photographic Society of Northwest Arkansas learning some tricks and tips on taking great nature photos.

    The opening session begins with long-time nature photographer Jay Stout.  Jay jumped into photography with both feet in 1978 and hasn’t looked back.  According to Stout, “My interests in photography include Wildlife, Landscape, Weather, and Architecture/Historical buildings, but I like to experiment in all other areas.  I was fortunate enough to be a featured photographer in Our Ozarks magazine, and published in Nature Photographer magazine.” 

    “There’s something about wildlife in its natural habitat that is very moving to me, and it’s exhilarating when I can capture that particular moment during a sunset when the colors and beauty are only available for about 5 minutes.  Those are the photographs that fuel my passion.”

    Jay will show a well-rounded array of his stunning photographs, and add stories and insights from his years as a seasoned photographer.

    After Jay’s presentation will be an opportunity to learn how to get the most out of your camera when you photograph Nature.  If you are just beginning to shoot photos of nature and want some great tips, you will want to attend the lecture and photoshoot that follows Jay’s presentation.   The program is not for the professional…beginners only please.  Don’t be bashful or self-conscience because you don’t have a     3-foot long lens on your camera.  You don’t need it.  That’s not what this program is about.  It truly is for novices, greenhorns, and rookies.

    Also note the time of year of this presentation.  We don’t have a lot of wildflowers and other plants with lush foliage to photograph in March.  Here’s the point.  No matter what time of year it is, there is ALWAYS something wonderful to photograph.  That’s what you will learn from Cleeo Wright, nature photographer, with the Photographic Society of Northwest Arkansas (PSNWA).

    Cleeo will present a lecture in the Hobbs State Park visitor center on Beginning Nature Photography.  Afterwards is the photoshoot where he will help all participants identify photographic “subjects” around the visitor center, and how best to photograph them with the camera that you bring.  This will be your program.  You ask the specific questions so you will get the specific knowledge that you are seeking as a nature photography learner.  Don’t pass up this extraordinary opportunity to learn basic nature photography from a professional in that field.

    Note:  Participants need to be familiar with the basic functions of their camera.  The lecture will help you understand how to utilize the functions your camera has to offer.  

    Where: Hobbs State Park visitor center located on Hwy 12 just east of the Hwy. 12/War Eagle Road intersection.

    When: Saturday March 16, 2019

    Time:     
    Opening session: 2:30 pm:  Featured photographer Jay Stout
    Photo class:  3:30 pm with Cleeo Wright, nature photographer

    Cost: Free.  The public is invited.

    For more information on Hobbs State Park programs, trails, picnicking, or meeting room rentals:   Call:  479-789-5000

  • 04 Mar 2019 1:26 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Jared Phillips, PHD, Director of Internship of International & Global Studies at the University of Arkansas, returns to Hobbs State Park to discuss another chapter of the fascinating story of the “Back to the Land Movement” in the Ozarks.  “Hipbillies” of the 1960s and 1970s had a profound influence on cities like Eureka Springs as well as northwest Arkansas in general.  According to professor Phillips, “Counterculture flourished nationwide in the 1960s and 1970s, and while the hippies of Haight–Ashbury occupied the public eye, a faction of back to the landers were quietly creating their own haven off the beaten path in the Arkansas Ozarks.  I will combine oral histories and archival resources to weave the story of the Ozarks and its population of country beatniks into the national narrative, showing how the back to the landers engaged in ‘deep revolution’ by sharing their ideas on rural development, small farm economy, and education with the locals—and how they became a fascinating part of a traditional region’s coming to terms with the modern world in the process.”

    One of the very interesting aspects of the Back to the Land Movement involved how it complicated the customary history of environmentalism in the Ozarks.  Environmentalism is the theory that environment, as opposed to heredity, has the primary influence on the development of a person or group.

    During the 1960s and 1970s, the Arkansas Ozarks found itself host to an evolving conversation on environmental stewardship as National Forest and other development interests clashed with young members of the back to the land movement (hipbillies) and local hill folk.  In part, this clash was the result of contested forestry and agriculture practices in the hills, but in reality the back to the land movement offered a uniquely American rebuke to the emerging environmentalist discourse of the day.  While agreeing that wild spaces were indeed important—after all, bioregions like the Buffalo River were (and are) central in countercultural efforts at ecological preservation—hipbillies argued that wild spaces made sense only in the context of working agricultural land.

    Join professor Phillips on a nostalgic stroll through an unforgettable and sometimes bumpy segment of our recent Ozark history.  If you were part of the Back to the Land Movement, come share some of your experiences.

    Where:  Hobbs State Park visitor center located on Hwy 12 just east of the Hwy. 12/War Eagle Road intersection.

    When:    Sunday March 10, 2019

    Time:      2:00 pm

    Cost:       Free.  The public is invited.

    For more information on Hobbs State Park programs, trails, picnicking, or meeting room rentals:   Call:  479-789-5000


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